Weekly Updates

Things we're currently thinking about.

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Calendar, time and priorities. This article really nails it for me, and there are a few (and some others) that I already do and definitely recommend for everybody.

  1. If someone cancels/reschedules twice, they don't think you're a priority. Move on to better things.
  2. Schedule time for yourself. Whether it's time to be creative, work outside your day-to-day or even just take a break. You need it, and more often than not you come back with fresh ideas. This means occasionally watching a movie in the middle of the day (the best time to do it).
  3. 45-minute meetings. 1 hour seems long, 30 minutes seems too short. The 45-minute session seem to be a good in between and helps to focus the meeting on the important stuff. No time for extra fluff. Also, my attention starts to drift around the 40-minute mark.

 

Weekly Updates

Things we're thinking about this week.

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Taking a step back. 

Is there ever a bad time to take a step back? Trying to figure out a complicated digital marketing strategy, take a step back and deciding on the mission will help you decide what to do or not to do. Overwhelmed in life, take a step back and see where you might be spending too much time. Tired of not making any progress in you diet, take a step back and realise that you have to be patient.

We're often too caught up on the little things. We overanalyse inconsequential details, waste time and become overwhelmed. Taking a step back always helps.

The Difference Between Working Hard and Working Long

 Photo by  Vladimir Kudinov  on  Unsplash

 

There is a huge difference between working hard and working long - but in Hong Kong, people don't always understand the difference.

Working long means clocking in 15+ hours every single day or working 80 hour weeks. For some people, it means just staying in the office until the boss/manager leaves (regardless if they have work to do or not).

Working long means that you're aware of the amount of time you're spending on your job. It is, after all, just a job.

Working hard means something else entirely. Working hard means that you're doing something different, something that hasn't been done before. If you're lucky, you'll end up with a positive result. There is some sort of risk involved.

You can fail at working hard, you just have to show up if you're working long.

The two aren’t exactly mutually exclusive, and working long might end up resulting in working hard (if you show up and work efficiently, you’ll likely end up in the position of attempting hard work).

Working hard takes a leap of faith. No matter how hard you try, working long won’t reap the same benefits.

When selecting a marketing agency or partner, are you looking for one that does the basics or one that is going to work with you and take some risk? Do you want similar ideas you see in the market, or ideas that make you stop and think?

Amateurs and 'do-it-all' agencies tend to be cheaper, but they also tend to just to the basics. On the other hand, the agencies that work hard are the ones that will come up with new, exciting ideas. One type can only do one thing (work long), the other can do both (work hard and long).

If you're looking to use marketing to stand out from the crowd and differentiate, then you need to look for an agency that works hard (not long).

Weekly Updates

Things we're thinking about this week.

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Sometimes it's grammar, sometimes it's just carelessness. The difference between shameful and shameless, everyday and every day - just two examples of commonly missed/misused terms. The problem, I think, is that marketers treat their customers like they're idiots (they're not). They're so used to telling people about 'limited offers' when people can see right through them and identify 'clearance stock'. Small differences, but it can really showcase whether a brand is honest and fun or just out trying to make a couple bucks. Shame.

(Also, brands should not (normally) be condescending.)

What to ask a social media agency/consultant?

 Photo by  Nathan Dumlao  on  Unsplash

Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash

If you haven't spent time working in digital marketing or social media in the past couple of years, it's going to very difficult for you to tell the difference between agencies that are mediocre, good or even great. If you've decided to put some money into getting support in the social media space, you don't want to be throwing money away. We've put together a couple questions (and things to watch out for) that should help you decide among all the technical jargon.


What does your agency specialise in?

What to look out for: There are a lot of agencies out there, and most will say that they can do anything — social media, SEO, SEM/PPC, Influencer, web design, UX/UI, content creation, etc. — stay away from these! It’s impossible to specialise in everything (as much as they try), and even harder for these agencies to have the right people working on the right things. If you’re looking for help in social media, look for social media experts — don’t for example ask for help from a PR agency, because they just aren’t equipped (and up to date) to properly manage social media.

Who will be working on the account?

What to look out for: You want to make sure that your account is being taken care of. There are cases that agencies will send their best business development people to the pitch meetings, and these people will disappear once the account is won (and you’re left with clueless junior staff). In general, you want to have a account director/manager who will be your key day to day and depending on your project, have experts in creative, management, analytics that help out as needed (whether it’s managed in-house or external). The key here is to make sure that they have a plan for making sure you account is handled as agreed (and they’re not stealing your money!).

What’s the social media strategy going to be?

What to look out for: If they answer right away without learning about your business, run away! The social media agency you work with needs to understand your business problems and needs — where are you struggling? What has been done in the past? Where do you need help? What needs to be addressed first? What is the competition doing? How much money do you have available? These are just some of the basic questions that need to be addressed. Blanket approaches won’t work, and you need to work with people that can help you where you need help the most.

What are the latest social media trends? Who’s doing social media well?

What to look out for: Social media is a changing landscape, and you want to make sure that the people you work with 1) know what’s happening and 2) have an opinion on where things are going to go. By asking this question, you should be able to see whether the agency is able to think independently and help drive your business forward. There should be a clear differentiation here, otherwise you might as well just hire a fresh grad instead. You want to be told what to do, rather than have to tell the agency what to do (they are after all the expert).

What social media platforms should we be on?

What to look out for: Building on the last point, the agency you work with needs to be the expert. Understanding the landscape they should be able to tell you which platforms make the most sense (can help convert) rather than just what’s the most popular (far too many recommend the basics — Facebook, Instagram, Twitter because that’s where everyone is, and not explaining how they can help the business).

What are we going to do with data/analytics?

What to look out for: Agencies should be able to talk about how to use data, and just as importantly when to use data. While there is a huge allure as to what data can do, in many cases companies aren’t able to take advantage of data simple because they don’t have a lot of data to play with (they’re way too small). Look for a social media agency that can use data to inform decisions, but doesn’t blindly follow the numbers (difference between causation and correlation isn’t addressed enough).

Where should we spend our money?

What to look out for: Find a company that can smartly look at a landscape and portion money as needed. You want to stay away from companies that are just looking to maximise their billings, and work with agencies that understand that digital isn’t always necessarily the best way to go (depending on the industry, many can still see a lot of benefit from events or CRM).

Who are your competitors?

What to look out for: Honesty. There are hundreds of competing digital agencies and consultants out there. This is a test to see if they’re honest people and whether they will be easy to work with. You want to work with a team that isn’t afraid to talk about the hard truth, and not just people that are good at kissing your butt.


These are just some of the questions that you should be asking when deciding on a social media agency. There are obviously many other questions you should be asking, but with all things being equal, the answers to these questions should help you put one agency over another.

Should you be paying for Marketing Services?

 https://www.fuandg.com/resources/

https://www.fuandg.com/resources/

Short answer - NO.

People are busy, and any are often looking for shortcuts. In the world of marketing, you can pay for help in literally anything you can think of - but that doesn't mean that you should!

There are a plethora of free tools that you can use to improve the marketing that you're doing. From SEO, to social media automation to reporting - as long as you're willing to look and learn, you can find tools that fit your needs. There are tools that you can buy to help you automate things, but using them doesn't necessarily mean that you're going to get better results.

A lot of people use tools because it gives off the appearance that they're doing something useful. It's honestly a lazy way for people to feel like they have accomplished something. In reality, most people never fully utilise the basic tools that are available for free (e.g. Facebook Insights).

Using tools are fine, but don't use them as a substitute for learning. I've gathered a plethora of free tools and resources you can use today right here.